June 2014Open Source News

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Re: Open Source News

Postby ryanvade » Sat Jul 20, 2013 9:27 am

tanmay.01 wrote:I am on my phone its 4:50am

Sent from my Nexus 4

No problem, I took care of it for you. ;smile
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Re: Open Source News

Postby mmesantos1 » Tue Sep 03, 2013 7:57 am

Ok so for those of you who use google drive like myself you may like this! ;smile

Article Courtesy Of WebUpd8: http://www.webupd8.org/2013/09/mount-google-drive-in-linux-with-google.html

Mount Google Drive In Linux With google-drive-ocamlfuse

More than a year after Google has announced its file storage and synchronization service called Drive, there's still no official Linux client. There are some unofficial clients, but they're not perfect: Insync is not free, Grive is command line only and its development seems to have stopped and so on.

So here's another alternative for easily managing your Google Drive files under Linux: google-drive-ocamlfuse.

google-drive-ocamlfuse is a FUSE filesystem backend for Google Drive which you can use to mount your Google Drive under Linux.

Image

Among its features are full read/write support for regular files and folders, multiple account support, duplicate file handling as well as access to the Google Drive trash directory. google-drive-ocamlfuse also provides read-only access to Google Docs, Sheets and Slides, which its converts to ODT, ODS of PDF (this can be configured).

google-drive-ocamlfuse is still under testing so while it works pretty well, you may encounter bugs. For instance, in my test, some Google documents weren't converted for some reason.

It's also worth mentioning that the changes don't show up instantly - when you edit or upload a new file, it can take 60 seconds (this is configurable) until the changes show up in the mounted filesystem. If newly added files don't show up in your file manager, enter the folder again or refresh it (Ctrl + F).

Install google-drive-ocamlfuse in Ubuntu

There are two ways of installing google-drive-ocamlfuse in Ubuntu:

A. Using precompiled binaries (easier to install, but there aren't binaries for all Ubuntu versions / architectures)

The google-drive-ocamlfuse developer provides binaries for Ubuntu 12.04 64bit, 12.10 32bit and 64bit and Ubuntu 13.04 64bit - download the archive for your Ubuntu version and architecture from HERE: https://github.com/astrada/google-drive-ocamlfuse/wiki/Installation

Extract the archive in your home folder and run the following command to install it:

Code: Select all

sudo install ~/google-drive-ocamlfuse*/google-drive-ocamlfuse /usr/local/bin/


You'll also need to install the following dependencies:

Code: Select all

sudo apt-get install libcurl3-gnutls libfuse2 libsqlite3-0


B. Using OPAM

google-drive-ocamlfuse can be installed using OPAM, a package manager for OCaml. Firstly, install OPAM and OCaml in Ubuntu 13.04, 12.10 or 12.04 using the commands below:

Code: Select all

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:avsm/ppa-opam-unstable
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ocaml opam


Next, install the dependencies (this is required because these dependencies are not managed by OPAM):

Code: Select all

sudo apt-get install m4 libcurl4-gnutls-dev libfuse-dev libsqlite3-dev


Then, install google-drive-ocamlfuse:

Code: Select all

opam init
opam update
opam install google-drive-ocamlfuse
sudo install ~/.opam/system/bin/google-drive-ocamlfuse /usr/local/bin/


I've used the last command above to install the google-drive-ocamlfuse binary to /usr/local/bin/, because by default it's installed under ~/.opam/system/bin/. Instead of this, you could add $HOME/.opam/system/bin/ to your PATH.

Usage

Firstly, you need to authorize google-drive-ocamlfuse with Google. To do this, run the following command:

Code: Select all

google-drive-ocamlfuse


This should open a tab in your default web browser, asking to allow google-drive-ocamlfuse to access your Google Drive. Click "Allow", wait a few seconds for google-drive-ocamlfuse to retrieve the authorization code and you're done.

Now let's mount Google Drive. Create a folder in your home directory, let's call it "gdrive":

Code: Select all

mkdir ~/gdrive


And mount Goole Drive using the command below:

Code: Select all

google-drive-ocamlfuse ~/gdrive


That's it. If you want to configure the interval between queries to detect server-side changes, the export format used for Google documents and so on, see the configuration file: ~/.gdfuse/default/config

To mount Google Drive on startup, add "google-drive-ocamlfuse /path/to/gdrive" (replacing "/path/to/ with the exact path to the folder where you want to mount Google Drive) to Startup Applications.

For more info, including using multiple accounts, see the google-drive-ocamlfuse wiki: https://github.com/astrada/google-drive-ocamlfuse/wiki
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Re: Open Source News

Postby mmesantos1 » Tue Sep 03, 2013 9:35 am

If your like me I have been leaning towards using the more stable LTS releases, so that being said here is some news on the next LTS release date. ;smile

Article Courtesy Of OMG Ubuntu: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2013/08/ubuntu-14-04-lts-release-schedule

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Release Schedule Revealed

April 17th 2014 – that’s the tentative date set for the release of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

The date, along with those for the various milestones used during a development cycle, are listed on the ‘T’ series release schedule on the Ubuntu Wiki.

All of the dates listed on the wiki (and reprinted below) are subject to change. So, for now, take a mental note of them in pencil rather than ink.

Ubuntu 13.10, currently in progress, is due to land on October 17th.
Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Release Dates

In keeping with the release schedules for the last 2 release cycles, Ubuntu (proper) will participate from the final beta milestone onwards.

Ubuntu’s siblings, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Kubuntu & co, will be available for testing sooner, with two alpha and beta milestones available to them.

    Alpha 1 - December 19th (for flavours)
    Alpha 2 – January 23rd (for flavours)
    Beta 1 – February 27th (for flavours)
    Final Beta – March 27th
    Release Candidate – April 10th

With the final release scheduled for:

    Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – April 17th

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Re: Open Source News

Postby mmesantos1 » Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:01 pm

Ok so with the UEFI coming and the need for a signed kernel to boot thought this would be a good read for your all who are interested. ;smile

Article Courtesy Of Linux.com: Booting a Self-Signed Linux Kernel | Linux.com

Booting a Self-Signed Linux Kernel

Now that The Linux Foundation is a member of the UEFI.org group, I’ve been working on the procedures for how to boot a self-signed Linux kernel on a platform so that you do not have to rely on any external signing authority.
After digging through the documentation out there, it turns out to be relatively simple in the end, so here’s a recipe for how I did this, and how you can duplicate it yourself on your own machine.

We don’t need no stinkin bootloaders!

When building your kernel image, make sure the following options are set.

The first two options here enable EFI mode, and tell the kernel to build itself as a EFI binary that can be run directly from the UEFI bios. This means that no bootloader is involved at all in the system, the UEFI bios just boots the kernel, no “intermediate” step needed at all. As much as I love gummiboot, if you trust the kernel image you are running is “correct”, this is the simplest way to boot a signed kernel.

As no bootloader is going to be involved in the boot process, you need to ensure that the kernel knows where the root partition is, what init is going to be run, and anything else that the bootloader normally passes to the kernel image. The option listed above, CONFIG_CMDLINE should be set to whatever you want the kernel to use as the command line.

Also, as we don’t have an initrd passed by the bootloader to the kernel, if you want to use one, you need to build it into the kernel itself. The option CONFIG_INITRAMFS_SOURCE should be set to your pre-built cpio initramfs image you wish to use.

Note, if you don’t want to use an initrd/initramfs, don’t set this last option. Also, currently it’s a bit of a pain to build the kernel, build the initrd using dracut with the needed dracut modules and kernel modules, and then rebuild the kernel adding the cpio image to the kernel image. I’ll be working next on taking a pre-built kernel image, tearing it apart and adding a cpio image directly to it, no need to rebuild the kernel. Hopefully that can be done with only a minimal use of libbfd

After setting these options, build the kernel and install it on your boot partition (it is in FAT mode, so that UEFI can find it, right?) To have UEFI boot it directly, you can place it in /boot/EFI/boot/bootx64.efi, so that UEFI will treat it as the “default” bootloader for the machine.

Lather, rinse, repeat

After you have a kernel image installed on your boot partition, it’s time to test it.

Reboot the machine, and go into the BIOS. Usually this means pounding on the F2 key as the boot starts up, but all machines are different, so it might take some experimentation to determine which key your BIOS needs. See this post from Mathew Gerrit: http://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/24869.html for the problems you might run into trying to get into BIOS mode on UEFI-based laptops.

Traverse the BIOS settings and find the place where UEFI boot mode is specified, and turn it the “Secure Boot” option OFF.

Save the option and reboot, the BIOS should find the kernel located at boot/EFI/boot/bootx64.efi and boot it directly. If your kernel command line and initramfs (if you used one) are set up properly, you should now be up and running and able to use your machine as normal.

If you can’t boot properly, ensure that your kernel command line was set correctly, or that your initramfs has the needed kernel modules in it. This usually takes a few times back and forth to get all of the correct settings properly configured.

Only after you can successfully boot the kernel directly from the BIOS, in “insecure” mode should you move to the next step.

Keys to the system

Now that you have a working kernel image and system, it is time to start messing with keys. There are three different types of UEFI keys that you need to learn about, the “Platform Key” (known as a “PK”), the “Key-Exchange Keys” (known as a “KEK”), and the “Signature Database Key” (known as a “db”). For a simple description of what these keys mean, see the Linux Foundation Whitepaper about UEFI Secure boot, published back in 2011. For a more detailed description of the keys, see the UEFI Specification directly.

For a very simple description, the “Platform Key” shows who “owns and controls” the hardware platform. The “Key-Exchange keys” shows who is allowed to update the hardware platform, and the “Signature Database keys” show who is allowed to boot the platform in secure mode.

If you are interested in how to manipulate these keys, replace them, and do neat things with them, see James Bottomley’s blog for descriptions of the tools you can use and much more detail than I provide here.

To manipulate the keys on the system, you need the the UEFI keytool USB image from James’s website called sb-usb.img (md5sum 7971231d133e41dd667a184c255b599f). dd the image to a USB drive, and boot the machine into the image.

Depending on the mode of the system (insecure or secure), you will be dropped to the UEFI console, or be presented with a menu. If a command line, type KeyTool to run the keytool binary. If a menu, select the option to run KeyTool directly.

Save the keys

First thing to do, you should save the keys that are currently on the system, in case something “bad” ever happens and you really want to be able to boot another operating system in secure mode on the hardware. Go through the menu options in the KeyTool program and save off the PK, KEK, and db keys to the USB drive, or to the hard drive, or another USB drive you plug into the system.

Take those keys and store them somewhere “safe”.

Clear the machine

Next you should remove all keys from the system. You can do this from the KeyTool program directly, or just reboot into the BIOS and select an option to “remove all keys”, if your BIOS provides this (some do, and some don’t.)

Create and install your own keys

Now that you have an “empty” machine, with the previous keys saved off somewhere else, you should download the sbsigntool and efiutil packages and install them on your development system. James has built all of the latest versions of these packages in the openSUSE build system for all RPM and DEB-based Linux distros. If you have a Gentoo-based system, I have checked the needed versions into portage, so just grab them directly from there.

If you want to build these from source, the sbsigntool git tree can be found here, and the efitools git tree is [here][efitools].

The efitools README is a great summary of how to create new keys, and here is the commands it says to follow in order to create your own set of keys:

The option -subj can contain a string with whatever name you wish to have for your key, be it your company name, or the like. Other fields can be specified as well to make the key more “descriptive”.

Then, take the PK key you have created, turn it into a EFI Signature List file, and add a GUID to the key:

Where my random guid is any valid guid you wish to use (I’ve seen some companies use all ‘5’ as their guid, so I’d recommend picking something else a bit more “random” to make look like you know what you are doing with your key…).

Now take the EFI Signature List file and create a signed update file:

For more details about the key creation (and to see where I copied these command lines from), see James’s post about owning your own Windows 8 platform.

Take these files you have created, put them on a USB disk, run the KeyTool program and use it to add the db, KEK, and PK keys into the BIOS. Note, apply the PK key last, as once it is installed, the platform will be “locked” and you should not be able to add any other keys to the system.

Fail to boot

Now that your own set of keys is installed in the system, flip the BIOS back into “Secure boot” mode, and try to boot your previous-successful Linux image again.

Hopefully it should fail with some type of warning, the laptop I did this testing on provides this “informative” graphic:
Image

Sign your kernel

Now that your kernel can’t boot, you need to sign it with the db key you placed in your bios:

Take the bzImage.signed file and put it back in the boot partition, copying over the unsigned /boot/EFI/boot/bootx64.efi file.

Profit!

Now, rebooting the machine should cause the UEFI bios to check the signatures of the signed kernel image, and boot it properly.

Demo

I’ve recorded a video of a Gateway laptop booting a signed kernel, with my own key, here. The demo tries to boot an unsigned kernel image that is on the hard disk, but it fails. I plug in a signed kernel that is on the USB disk, and it properly boots.

I did the test with a CoreOS image as it provides a very small self-contained Linux system that allows for easy testing/building from a development machine.

Future plans

Now that you have full control over your system, running only a Linux kernel image that you sign yourself, a whole raft of possibilities open up. Here’s a few that I can think off of the top of my head:

    Linux signed system self-contained in the kernel image (with initramfs) booting into ram, nothing on the disk other than the original kernel image.
    Signed kernel image initramfs validates the other partitions with a public key to ensure they aren’t tampered before mounting and using them (ChromeOS does this exact thing quite well). This passes the “chain of trust” on to the filesystem image, giving you assurances that you are running code you trust, on a platform you trust.
    Combine signed kernel images with TPM key storage to unlock encrypted partitions.

If you are interested in these types of things, I’ll be at the Linux Plumbers Conference in a few weeks, where a bunch of people will be discussing secure boot issues with Linux. I’ll also be at LinuxCon North America, Europe, and Korea if you want to talk about UEFI and Linux issues there.

Read more at Greg Kroah-Hartman's Blog: http://kroah.com/log/blog/2013/09/02/booting-a-self-signed-linux-kernel/

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Re: Open Source News

Postby mmesantos1 » Fri Sep 06, 2013 10:27 pm

Ok so for those running Intel graphics chipsets this may bring some good news for you! ;grin

Article Courtesy Of WebUpD8: http://www.webupd8.org/2013/09/adobe-flash-player-hardware.html

Adobe Flash Player Hardware Acceleration on Intel Graphics Cards

libvdpau-va-gl is a VDPAU driver that uses OpenGL under the hood to accelerate drawing and scaling, and VA-API (if available) to accelerate video decoding.

Using it, you can get hardware acceleration on some Intel graphics cards for Mplayer (well, we already have mplayer-vaapi but it hasn't been merged) and even Adobe Flash Player. That means a lot less CPU usage as you'll see below.

Image

AMD users: in theory, this should also work with AMD cards (Catalyst) however, from what users are reporting, it doesn't seem to work properly and the libvdpau-va-gl developer said that he can only test this on Intel, so it's unlikely that the AMD bugs will be fixed soon. However, the open source AMD drivers should have built-in VDPAU support (you need Linux 3.10 and Mesa 9.2).

In my test (Ubuntu 13.10, Intel graphics), a full-screen 1080p flash YouTube video used around 160-170% CPU without libvdpau-va-gl and about 14-17% CPU when using libvdpau-va-gl. There were some occasional spikes when using libvdpau-va-gl, but usually it stayed around those values which is a really great improvement.

Note: I've tested this with Firefox and Chromium browsers with Adobe Flash Player 11.2 r202. It doesn't seem to work with Pepper Flash (available by default in Google Chrome).

libvdpau-va-gl is work-in-progress and while it has worked properly with Adobe Flash Player / Firefox on my system, it may not work properly for you or it may cause problems with other VDPAU-enabled applications and for this reason, it's advisable not to use this system-wide.

Below you can watch a quick video demoing the CPU usage for a YouTube flash video, with and without libvdpau-va-gl:

YouTube

Install and set up libvdpau-va-gl in Ubuntu

1. Firstly, install the VAAPI drivers (for Intel HD Graphics as well as G45 and later)::

Code: Select all

sudo apt-get install i965-va-driver


2. Install libvdpau-va-gl by using the main WebUpd8 PPA (I've used Vincent Bernat's Debian packaging - thanks!):

Code: Select all

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install libvdpau-va-gl1


3. Adobe Flash doesn't use hardware acceleration by default on Linux so we'll have to force it:
sudo mkdir -p /etc/adobe
echo "EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1" | sudo tee /etc/adobe/mms.cfg
echo "OverrideGPUValidation=1" | sudo tee -a /etc/adobe/mms.cfg

4. Like I was telling you above, it's not a good idea to enable libvdpau-va-gl system-wide yet. Instead, you can simply launch an application with "VDPAU_DRIVER=va_gl".

Example: to launch Firefox with libvdpau-va-gl enabled, use:

Code: Select all

VDPAU_DRIVER=va_gl firefox


To enable libvdpau-va-gl system-wide (not recommended for now because this may cause problems with some VDPAU-enabled applications), you need to open /etc/X11/Xsession.d/20vdpau-va-gl as root with a text editor and uncomment (remove the "#" in front of the lines) the last two lines. Or simply copy/paste the commands below:

Code: Select all

sudo sed -i "s/^# \[/\[/g" /etc/X11/Xsession.d/20vdpau-va-gl
sudo sed -i "s/^#   export/  export/g" /etc/X11/Xsession.d/20vdpau-va-gl


5. Optional: check if libvdpau-va-gl/VDPAU is working.

You can check if libvdpau-va-gl is working and Adobe Flash Player uses hardware acceleration by right clicking a Flash video on YouTube and selecting "Stats for nerds". The stats box that shows up should display the following: "accelerated video rendering, accelerated video decoding", like in this screenshot.

Another way to check if libvdpau-va-gl/VDPAU is working propely, install vdpauinfo:

Code: Select all

sudo apt-get install vdpauinfo


Then, run:

Code: Select all

VDPAU_DRIVER=va_gl vdpauinfo


And you should get something like THIS:
Spoiler: show
⏚ [andrei:~] $ VDPAU_DRIVER=va_gl vdpauinfo
display: :0 screen: 0
[VS] Software VDPAU backend library initialized
libva info: VA-API version 0.33.0
libva info: va_getDriverName() returns 0
libva info: Trying to open /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/dri/i965_drv_video.so
libva info: Found init function __vaDriverInit_0_33
libva info: va_openDriver() returns 0
API version: 1
Information string: OpenGL/VAAPI/libswscale backend for VDPAU

Video surface:

name width height types
-------------------------------------------
420 1920 1080 NV12 YV12 UYVY YUYV Y8U8V8A8 V8U8Y8A8
422 1920 1080 NV12 YV12 UYVY YUYV Y8U8V8A8 V8U8Y8A8
444 1920 1080 NV12 YV12 UYVY YUYV Y8U8V8A8 V8U8Y8A8

Decoder capabilities:

name level macbs width height
-------------------------------------------
MPEG2_SIMPLE 3 16384 2048 2048
MPEG2_MAIN 3 16384 2048 2048
H264_BASELINE 51 16384 2048 2048
H264_MAIN 51 16384 2048 2048
H264_HIGH 51 16384 2048 2048
VC1_SIMPLE 1 16384 2048 2048
VC1_MAIN 2 16384 2048 2048
VC1_ADVANCED 4 16384 2048 2048

Output surface:

name width height nat types
----------------------------------------------------
B8G8R8A8 8192 8192 -
R8G8B8A8 8192 8192 -
R10G10B10A2 8192 8192 -
B10G10R10A2 8192 8192 -
A8 8192 8192 -

Bitmap surface:

name width height
------------------------------
B8G8R8A8 8192 8192
R8G8B8A8 8192 8192
R10G10B10A2 8192 8192
B10G10R10A2 8192 8192
A8 8192 8192

Video mixer:

feature name sup
------------------------------------
DEINTERLACE_TEMPORAL -
DEINTERLACE_TEMPORAL_SPATIAL -
INVERSE_TELECINE -
NOISE_REDUCTION -
SHARPNESS -
LUMA_KEY -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L1 -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L2 -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L3 -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L4 -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L5 -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L6 -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L7 -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L8 -
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L9 -

parameter name sup min max
-----------------------------------------------------
VIDEO_SURFACE_WIDTH -
VIDEO_SURFACE_HEIGHT -
CHROMA_TYPE -
LAYERS -

attribute name sup min max
-----------------------------------------------------
BACKGROUND_COLOR -
CSC_MATRIX -
NOISE_REDUCTION_LEVEL -
SHARPNESS_LEVEL -
LUMA_KEY_MIN_LUMA -
LUMA_KEY_MAX_LUMA -


If you get an error (for example "Failed to open VDPAU backend"), either your graphics card doesn't support VA-API (since this VDPAU driver requires VA-API) or you've missed a step from the instructions above.

For more information, source code or bug reports, see the libvdpau-va-gl GitHub: https://github.com/i-rinat/libvdpau-va-gl

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Re: Open Source News

Postby ryanvade » Fri Sep 06, 2013 11:57 pm

I am seeing a slight improvement with libvdpau-va-gl on firefox-nightly...thanks.
Spoiler: show
VDPAU_DRIVER=va_gl vdpauinfo
display: :0.0 screen: 0
[VS] Software VDPAU backend library initialized
[VS] {full} vdp_imp_device_create_x11 display=0x97b010, screen=0
libva: VA-API version 0.32.0
libva: va_getDriverName() returns 0
libva: Trying to open /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/dri/i965_drv_video.so
libva: va_openDriver() returns 0
[VS] libva (version 0.32) library initialized
[VS] {full} VdpGetApiVersion
[VS] {full} VdpGetInformationString
API version: 1
Information string: OpenGL/VAAPI/libswscale backend for VDPAU

Video surface:

name width height types
-------------------------------------------
[VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_420
420 1920 1080 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_420, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_NV12
NV12 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_420, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YV12
YV12 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_420, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_UYVY
UYVY [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_420, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YUYV
YUYV [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_420, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_Y8U8V8A8
Y8U8V8A8 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_420, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_V8U8Y8A8
V8U8Y8A8
[VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_422
422 1920 1080 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_422, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_NV12
NV12 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_422, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YV12
YV12 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_422, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_UYVY
UYVY [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_422, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YUYV
YUYV [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_422, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_Y8U8V8A8
Y8U8V8A8 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_422, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_V8U8Y8A8
V8U8Y8A8
[VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_444
444 1920 1080 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_444, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_NV12
NV12 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_444, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YV12
YV12 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_444, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_UYVY
UYVY [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_444, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YUYV
YUYV [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_444, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_Y8U8V8A8
Y8U8V8A8 [VS] {part} VdpVideoSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_chroma_type=VDP_CHROMA_TYPE_444, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_V8U8Y8A8
V8U8Y8A8

Decoder capabilities:

name level macbs width height
-------------------------------------------
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_MPEG1
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_MPEG2_SIMPLE
MPEG2_SIMPLE 3 16384 2048 2048
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_MPEG2_MAIN
MPEG2_MAIN 3 16384 2048 2048
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_H264_BASELINE
H264_BASELINE 51 16384 2048 2048
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_H264_MAIN
H264_MAIN 51 16384 2048 2048
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_H264_HIGH
H264_HIGH 51 16384 2048 2048
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_VC1_SIMPLE
VC1_SIMPLE 1 16384 2048 2048
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_VC1_MAIN
VC1_MAIN 2 16384 2048 2048
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_VC1_ADVANCED
VC1_ADVANCED 4 16384 2048 2048
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_MPEG4_PART2_SP
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_MPEG4_PART2_ASP
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_DIVX4_QMOBILE
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_DIVX4_MOBILE
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_DIVX4_HOME_THEATER
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_DIVX4_HD_1080P
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_DIVX5_QMOBILE
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_DIVX5_MOBILE
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_DIVX5_HOME_THEATER
[VS] {part} VdpDecoderQueryCapabilities device=1, profile=VDP_DECODER_PROFILE_DIVX5_HD_1080P

Output surface:

name width height nat types
----------------------------------------------------
[VS] {full} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsNativeCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8
B8G8R8A8 8192 8192 - [VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_NV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_UYVY
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YUYV
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_Y8U8V8A8
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_V8U8Y8A8

[VS] {full} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsNativeCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8
R8G8B8A8 8192 8192 - [VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_NV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_UYVY
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YUYV
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_Y8U8V8A8
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_V8U8Y8A8

[VS] {full} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsNativeCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2
R10G10B10A2 8192 8192 - [VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_NV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_UYVY
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YUYV
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_Y8U8V8A8
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_V8U8Y8A8

[VS] {full} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B10G10R10A2
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsNativeCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B10G10R10A2
B10G10R10A2 8192 8192 - [VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_NV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_UYVY
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YUYV
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_Y8U8V8A8
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_V8U8Y8A8

[VS] {full} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_A8
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryGetPutBitsNativeCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_A8
A8 8192 8192 - [VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_NV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YV12
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_UYVY
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_YUYV
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_Y8U8V8A8
[VS] {zilch} VdpOutputSurfaceQueryPutBitsYCbCrCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8, bits_ycbcr_format=VDP_YCBCR_FORMAT_V8U8Y8A8


Bitmap surface:

name width height
------------------------------
[VS] {full} VdpBitmapSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8
B8G8R8A8 8192 8192
[VS] {full} VdpBitmapSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8
R8G8B8A8 8192 8192
[VS] {full} VdpBitmapSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2
R10G10B10A2 8192 8192
[VS] {full} VdpBitmapSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_B10G10R10A2
B10G10R10A2 8192 8192
[VS] {full} VdpBitmapSurfaceQueryCapabilities device=1, surface_rgba_format=VDP_RGBA_FORMAT_A8
A8 8192 8192

Video mixer:

feature name sup
------------------------------------
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_DEINTERLACE_TEMPORAL
DEINTERLACE_TEMPORAL -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_DEINTERLACE_TEMPORAL_SPATIAL
DEINTERLACE_TEMPORAL_SPATIAL -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_INVERSE_TELECINE
INVERSE_TELECINE -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_NOISE_REDUCTION
NOISE_REDUCTION -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_SHARPNESS
SHARPNESS -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_LUMA_KEY
LUMA_KEY -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L1
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L1 -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L2
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L2 -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L3
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L3 -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L4
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L4 -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L5
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L5 -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L6
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L6 -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L7
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L7 -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L8
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L8 -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryFeatureSupport device=1, feature=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_FEATURE_HIGH_QUALITY_SCALING_L9
HIGH QUALITY SCALING - L9 -

parameter name sup min max
-----------------------------------------------------
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryParameterSupport device=1, parameter=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_PARAMETER_VIDEO_SURFACE_WIDTH
VIDEO_SURFACE_WIDTH -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryParameterSupport device=1, parameter=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_PARAMETER_VIDEO_SURFACE_HEIGHT
VIDEO_SURFACE_HEIGHT -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryParameterSupport device=1, parameter=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_PARAMETER_CHROMA_TYPE
CHROMA_TYPE -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryParameterSupport device=1, parameter=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_PARAMETER_LAYERS
LAYERS -

attribute name sup min max
-----------------------------------------------------
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryAttributeSupport device=1, attribute=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_ATTRIBUTE_BACKGROUND_COLOR
BACKGROUND_COLOR -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryAttributeSupport device=1, attribute=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_ATTRIBUTE_CSC_MATRIX
CSC_MATRIX -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryAttributeSupport device=1, attribute=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_ATTRIBUTE_NOISE_REDUCTION_LEVEL
NOISE_REDUCTION_LEVEL -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryAttributeSupport device=1, attribute=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_ATTRIBUTE_SHARPNESS_LEVEL
SHARPNESS_LEVEL -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryAttributeSupport device=1, attribute=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_ATTRIBUTE_LUMA_KEY_MIN_LUMA
LUMA_KEY_MIN_LUMA -
[VS] {zilch} VdpVideoMixerQueryAttributeSupport device=1, attribute=VDP_VIDEO_MIXER_ATTRIBUTE_LUMA_KEY_MAX_LUMA
LUMA_KEY_MAX_LUMA -

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Re: Open Source News

Postby mmesantos1 » Sat Sep 07, 2013 12:50 am

Your very welcome ryanvade, so glad you found the post useful. ;smile

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Re: Open Source News

Postby mmesantos1 » Sat Sep 07, 2013 12:55 am

Ok so for those of you who are brave enough to run this on your phone here is some good news for you. ;grin

Article Courtesy Of OMG Ubuntu: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2013/09/ubuntu-touch-improves-system-updating

Ubuntu Touch Adds Over-The-Air System Updates

Over-the-air updates have been enabled on the development builds of Ubuntu Touch.

Supported Nexus devices will, from this week, be able to check for and receive future updates straight from the OS itself.

Until now testers have needed to manually apply updates by flashing newer images to their device using the ‘phablet-flash’ command line tool.WiFi.

‘Updates will be pushed over the air and can be applied through the Updates panel in the System Settings,’ explains Touch developer Stéphane Graber on his blog.

The implementation isn’t quite polished. Graber notes that while the Updates panel in Ubuntu Touch currently lacks a progress bar to convey the status of a download ’it doesn’t mean it’s not working’ in the background.

Ubuntu Touch ‘version 1.0′ is scheduled for release this October. Four Nexus devices will be officially supported at launch: the Samsung Galaxy Nexus and Nexus 4 smartphones, and the Nexus 7 and 10 tablets.

Further devices will be supported by the community through the Ubuntu Touch Ports project.

Image

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Re: Open Source News

Postby mmesantos1 » Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:18 pm

Well some good news for Linux, when Dell increases Linux based PC's in the country with the worlds largest population it has to be a good day for Linux! ;grin ;yush

Article Courtesy Of OMG Ubuntu: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2013/09/dell-to-increase-number-of-stores-selling-ubuntu-loaded-laptops

Dell To Expand Ubuntu Retail Presence in China

Dell are to more than double the number of its Chinese retail stores stocking Ubuntu-loaded laptops, Canonical has announced.

Over 1,000 of Dell’s consumer-facing outlets in China will begin selling computers loaded with the Chinese-language edition of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS over the coming weeks – up from the 400 stores that currently do so.

While the expansion is a sure sign that Dell’s Ubuntu devices are meeting with some success in China – no doubt buoyed by the government endorsement of Ubuntu Kylin as the de-facto Chinese OS - industry analysts are forecasting a steeper drop in PC sales for the country than in any other market.

Growing demand for mobile computing devices like tablets is, analysts say, to ‘blame’ for the down-turn.

In the medium term this trend could play to Ubuntu’s advantage.

China is now the biggest smartphone market in the world; China Unicom is a member of the Carrier Advisory Group for Ubuntu Touch; and the Chinese government has expressed a growing unease about a culture of Android dependence.

But, short of any firm mobile commitments in China, Ubuntu will need to pin its hope on maintaining comparatively strong sales in a market otherwise careering downwards.

Government endorsements, a burgeoning mobile app developer culture, and retail presence in 1,000 stores should all go a long way to ensuring that.

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Re: Open Source News

Postby mmesantos1 » Mon Sep 09, 2013 10:27 am

So for those of you who have not seen this news it looks like Intel is pulling support for Mir from its driver. As Oz Unity bases it's OS directly from Ubuntu with Unity it makes me wonder how this will impact things. I also am concered about Nvidia and ATI support for Mir as well. It is said that there will be support for all 3 major video card makers but I wonder how well the support will be. At any rate here is the article that has been causing quite the buzz in the Linux world. As for me it makes me wish they would just choose one video stack for Linux instead of having Wayland and Mir. ;smile

Article Courtesy Of OMG Ubuntu: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2013/09/intel-remove-xmir-support-in-xorg-video-driver

Intel Remove XMir Support From Xorg Driver

Intel pulled support for XMir from their Xorg driver branch yesterday, just days after the code was merged.

The escalation comes after a commit from Canonical’s Christopher Halse Rogers from 4 September to Intel’s xf86-video-intel driver was reverted on 7 September.

The sparse message accompanying the revert was signed with a vague, though telling line: “Ordered-by: The Management.”

A few minutes later, a subsequent commit included a short, though elucidative blurb in the NEWS file for Snapshot 2.99.902:

“We do not condone or support Canonical in the course of action they have chosen, and will not carry XMir patches upstream.

–The Management”

‘[Intel Are] trying to win the race by tripping the competition, not by running faster.’

Intel’s decision isn’t entirely impartial. The company has a stake in the success of Wayland as the ‘next gen’ display server on Linux by employing several developers to work on it full-time.

Canonical’s Michael Hall, writing on Google+, described the decision as Intel ’…trying to win the race by tripping the competition, not by running faster.’
What This Means For You

Canonical are set to enable XMir in 13.10 for supported hardware. Though the removal of XMir support from the Intel drivers is a step backwards in some respects, Canonical plan on including the patches in their downstream packages nonetheless.

“[This decision] just means more work for [Canonical].”

If you will be using Intel graphics on Ubuntu 13.10, the drivers will continue to support XMir as they did up until yesterday – through patches.

Canonical’s Alan Pope explained the impact to us in a tweet earlier: “[This decision] just means more work for us (Canonical) to keep integrating xmir patches into x with each release/update.”

If you’re using any other distributions, it’ll be up to those individual distros to ship the additional XMir patches with their xf86-video-intel packages if they support Mir.


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